Global Issues & Seven Central Concepts

Students will explore non-literary and literary texts through the following Global Issues and Central Concepts.

Global Issues

  • Culture, identity and community:
    • Students might focus on the way in which texts explore aspects of family, class, race, ethnicity, nationality,religion, gender and sexuality, and the way these impact on individuals and societies. They might also focus on issues concerning migration, colonialism and nationalism.
  • Beliefs, values, and education:
    • Students might focus on the way in which texts explore the beliefs and values nurtured in particular societies and the ways they shape individuals, communities and educational systems. They might also explore the tensions that arise when there are conflicts of beliefs and values, and ethics.
  • Politics, power and justice:
    • Students might focus on the ways in which texts explore aspects of rights and responsibilities, the workings and structures of governments and institutions. They might also investigate hierarchies of power, the distribution of wealth and resources, the limits of justice and the law, equality and inequality, human rights and peace and conflict.
  • Art, creativity and the imagination:
    • Students might focus on the ways in which texts explore aspects of aesthetic inspiration, creation, craft, and beauty. They might also focus on the shaping and challenging of perceptions through art, and the function, value and effects of art in society.
  • Science, technology and the environment:
    • Students might focus on the ways in which texts explore the relationship between humans and the environment and the implications of technology and media for society. They might also consider the idea of scientific development and progress.


Seven Central Concepts

  • Identity
    • To what extent does an author’s identity or a reader’s identity influence the way a text is interpreted? To what extent does an author show a character’s struggle with his or her identity?
  • Culture
    • To what extent do values, beliefs, and attitudes of a time period influence a text’s meaning? How does the historical context of a work influence the way a reader interprets the text?
  • Creativity
    • To what extent does an author’s style (literary techniques) influence the way a reader interprets the work?
  • Communication
    • To what extent does an intended audience influence the way meaning is constructed and interpreted?
  • Perspective
    • To what extent do time and place influence the way a reader understands a text’s meaning? How does the perspective of the reader play a role in understanding a text?
  • Transformation
    • To what extent does one text influence another in order to create meaning? How does intertextuality play a role in creating meaning?
  • Representation
    • To what extent does literature reflect or distort or exaggerate reality in the texts?