Individual Oral Commentary

Individual Commentary, first examinations 2021

Assessed January of 12th Grade Year

The only difference between SL and HL Individual Commentary is that the HL is only weighted 20% while the SL is weighted 30%.

HL Internal Assessments 20%

This component consists of an individual oral which is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

Individual Oral (15 minutes)

  • Supported by an extract from one non-literary text and one from a literary work, students will offer a prepared response of 10 minutes, followed by 5 minutes of questions by the teacher, to the following prompt:
  • Examine the ways in which the global issue of your choice is presented through the content and form of two of the texts that you have studied. (40 marks) 20%


SL Internal Assessments 30%

This component consists of an individual oral which is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.


Individual Oral (15 minutes)

  • Supported by an extract from one non-literary text and one from a literary work, students will offer a prepared response of 10 minutes, followed by 5 minutes of questions by the teacher, to the following prompt:
  • Examine the ways in which the global issue of your choice is presented through the content and form of two of the texts that you have studied. (40 marks) 30%


Duration: 15 minutes (10 minutes: student individual oral; 5 minutes: teacher questions)

Weighting: 30% for SL, 20% for HL

Overview

The nature of the task

The individual oral addresses the following prompt:

Examine the ways in which the global issue of your choice is presented through the content and form of one of the works and one of the texts that you have studied.

Explanation of the task

  • The individual oral is based on the exploration the student has carried out in the learner portfolio. During this exploration process, the student will have investigated a series of non-literary texts and literary works and a variety of global issues.
  • In the lead up to the individual oral, the student must make a decision about which global issue and which text and work will be explored in the task. One work and one non-literary text must be selected. An extract of no more than 40 lines should be selected from each which is representative of the presence of the global issue in it. In forms or text types where the number of lines may not be applicable, teachers should be guided by the volume of text that can be discussed in sufficient depth in the time available.

Texts to Analyze

Selection of text, work and extracts

  • The work and text selected must have a clear connection with the global issue. The individual oral should be a well-supported argument about the ways in which both represent and explore the global issue.
  • Students must select two extracts, one from [ a literary] text and one from [non-literary] work, that clearly show significant moments when this global issue is being focused on. Normally these extracts should not exceed 40 lines or present an unmanageable amount of material to be analyzed.
  • As the student brings unannotated copies of these extracts to the individual oral, extracts which are too lengthy may hinder their ability to effectively expand the discussion to the text or work as a whole. An extract may be a complete text in itself, for example a whole poem or an advertisement. If the extract is from a literary text which is part of a larger work studied, such as a short story, or if it is a complete text which is part of a work studied, such as a poem, students should discuss relevant aspects of the broader work as a whole in their individual oral.
  • Types of texts
    • If the extract is a complete non-literary text, students should discuss relevant aspects of the broader body of work of the author of the text.
    • PHOTOGRAPH: In the case of a photograph, for example, the broader discussion should refer to other photographs by the same photographer. If identifying the single author of a non-literary text is not possible, students should use an ampler definition of authorship to broaden their discussion of the global issue.
    • ADVERTISEMENT: In the case of an advertisement, for example, students could refer to the other advertisements or commercials belonging to the same campaign, to other campaigns of the same brand or to other work produced by the advertising agency.
    • ARTICLE: In the case of an article, students could refer either to other articles by the same author or to the general editorial line of the medium in which the article was published. In cases such as the latter two, students should make explicit what constitutes their definition of authorship.
  • The extracts are meant to help students focus their responses, remove the need to learn quotations and enable them to explore more precise issues, such as style, specific devices and other distinct techniques used by authors to present the global issue. The choice of extracts should show the student’s understanding of the relevance of the part to the whole and enable coverage of larger and smaller choices made by the writers to shape their perspectives on the global issue


Excerpt from Language A: language and literature guide, first examinations 2021

Preparation

Students may prepare an outline to bring in to the examination room along with the unannotated passages.

EXAMPLE OUTLINE

  1. Introduction
    1. Global Issue: Politics, power, and justice
    2. Line of Inquiry: What rights and responsibilities factor in war? What hierarchies of power contribute to resolving conflict?
  2. Thesis statement:Both the picture and the song lyrics explore the image of war and the propaganda that goes into shaping public perception.
      1. Mini-thesis: In Bob Dylan’s song, “Master of War,” the speaker uses an accusatory tone, anaphora, allusion, and metaphorical language to criticize the romanticized version of war in realities of destruction.
      2. Mini-thesis: In the photograph of Nagasaki, the black and white image and the perspective convey a majestic image of war that is not the reality of the destruction and shows a clear purpose of grandeur to manipulate popular opinion.
  3. First text: “Masters of War” by Bob Dylan
    1. Accusatory tone
      1. “Come you masters of war” masters --hierarchy of power
    2. Anaphora
      1. You that build the death planes
      2. You that build all the bombs
    3. Allusion to show betrayal
      1. Like Judas of old Judas, allusion of betrayal
      2. You lie and deceive
        1. Betrayal the speaker feels against his superiors
    4. Metaphorical language
      1. Reckless experiment
        1. You play with my world
        2. Like it's your little toy
        3. You put a gun in my hand
        4. And you hide from my eyes
      2. Deception
        1. I can see through your masks masks --deceit, metaphor
  4. Second text: This picture is referred to as Mushroom Cloud Over Nagasaki by Lieutenant Charles Levy in 1945. This is a picture right after Fat Man on Nagasaki was dropped in WWII.
    1. Thesis statement: In the photograph, the photographer shows a stark contrast with black and white contours with a limited perspective in order to convey the power of victory in an image.
    2. Perspective
      1. longer perspective, zoomed out --in order to show the impact, full scale of mushroom cloud
      2. Limited perspective
        1. Not showing destruction below
        2. Presents an image power that may be limited in perspective such as the song references
          1. Similar to “masters of war” in the song
    3. Purpose
      1. used as an image of victory in newspapers in favor of bomb
    4. Contrast
      1. Sharp contrast, beautiful image of the cloud hiding the destruction below
      2. Censored the other pictures
  5. Conclusion
    1. Both the picture and the song lyrics explore the image of war and the propaganda that goes into shaping public perception.