Supervisors

Student & Supervisor Handbook


Timeline

Supervisors will have three meetings with the Personal Project Coordinator.

Supervisors/PP Coordinator ONLY, NO STUDENTS:

  • September 1: Supervisors select topics of interest from spreadsheet (no student names) and discuss role of student, coordinator, and supervisor

  • December 1st: Check in with supervisors, discuss expectations for completing research/taking action, Mac discusses the importance of standardization and calibration

  • February 21st: Partner with person, use form for each paper and assess the three IB examples, go through criteria and assess exemplars to start understanding standardization process

  • March 1st: Personal Project Paper Due, Supervisors can review the last section of paper and offer feedback

  • March 25th: All PERSONAL PROJECT PAPERS ARE DUE FOR IB AND SCORING

  • March 28th-April 5th Supervisors score their candidates papers out of 24 points, 8 points for each Criterion

  • Wednesday, April 6th, Supervisor Presentation (Scoring of the Meridian Personal Projects and Calibration)

    • Supervisors score another supervisor's candidates and then together the two supervisors compare their scores to calibrate their scores, find agreement

    • Final scores are recorded

    • Supervisors finish their reports for the Academic Integrity Form

  • April 11: Mrs. MacFarland uploads scores and documents

    • Academic Integrity and Meeting Notes Form from Managebac

    • Bibliography

    • Personal Project Paper


Supervisor/Student Meetings:

  • REQUIRED: Meet with supervisor by September 30: 1st Meeting (Investigating: review goals/refine goals/discuss process journal and taking action)

  • OPTIONAL: Meet with supervisor by October 20: Optional Meeting (Planning: finalize criteria/discuss research process/work in progress/taking action)

  • REQUIRED: Meet with supervisor by Nov 17: 2nd Meeting (Taking Action: discuss plan to complete product applying research to outcome, evaluate research criteria)

  • OPTIONAL: Meet with supervisor by January 12: Optional Meeting (Finishing Action/Reflecting: discuss finalizing product and finishing action, begin written component, begin reflecting)

  • REQUIRED: Meet with supervisor by February 22nd: 3rd Meeting (Reflecting: discuss reflection, finalizing report, preparing for exhibition)

3 Supervisor/Student Meetings Required

Supervisor Overview

  • Because this is such a comprehensive project, students must be provided with a supervisor to help guide them through the process. The supervisor is responsible for helping students think through their projects, however, the supervisor is NOT responsible for the project. The student is responsible. Similarly, supervisors do not have to be experts in the field the student chooses to explore for his/her project. Supervisors are providing general advice, not specific instruction.

  • In 9th grade, the personal project is facilitated through AB Days and by the 10th Grade College and Career Readiness Teacher. Each student will be assigned to a supervisor who expresses interest in the student’s topic. In addition, there will be several times that advisory will be used to assist in checking on Personal Projects. Advisory teachers with 9th/10th graders will participate when these checks occur.

  • Personal project information will be integrated into the advisory slides. Teachers will check in with students when they see them in class in order to:

    • Ensure the personal project topic satisfies appropriate legal and ethical standards with regard to health and safety, confidentiality, human rights, animal welfare and environmental issues

    • Provide guidance to students in the planning, research and completion of the personal project

    • Confirm the authenticity of the work submitted

  • Assigned Supervisors: Over the course of the year, supervisors must:

    • Participate in at least 5 meetings with students, scheduled on Wednesdays during PD time or either individually or in small groups during advisory or scheduled at times that work for you and the student, or on assigned meeting days

    • Attend at least 3 all group advisor trainings (Wednesday PD time)

    • Participate in the PP Exhibition

  • Supervisors are encouraged to check in with students frequently. However, there are five required meetings that students must document in their process journal on ManageBac. These meetings have a specific purpose, and there are certain talking-points that supervisors should touch upon for each.


Meeting #1 (By Sept 30): Investigating: (Blue Slice) The purpose of this meeting is to help students REQUIRED


1st Student Meeting (Planning)

Supervisors will work with students to determine ....

  • if the goal is viable and if there is a clear vision for research and product

  • if the project includes enough of a research component in order to help with developing the actual product

  • if the process journal is sufficient in documenting the progress so far

  • If the student has done some preliminary research and brainstormed ideas for the action portion of the project e.g. materials, budget, etc.



Helpful Links:


Supervisor Meeting Reflection: After meeting with their supervisor, students should reflect on the discussion in Managebac. They need to go to IB Manager, then Personal Project, and then click on Meetings with Supervisor. They should write between 250-400 words reflecting on your discussion using the following questions as a guide:

  • What is my learning goal and product goal that I discussed with my supervisor?

  • What specific research topics did I discuss with my supervisor?

  • Did the discussion help me think about my research and product more clearly as far as next steps? Explain.

  • What logistics did I discuss in our meeting that will help me with planning e.g. materials, budget, resources, etc.?

  • What other helpful tips or advice did I receive that could help me with my Personal Project?



OPTIONAL Meeting (October/November): Meeting #2 (Oct 20): Planning (Green Slice) OPTIONAL

Students may meet with their supervisor in order to ...

  • review the research completed so far in the process and acknowledge the quality of information and areas that still need to be explored

  • determine if research questions are appropriate for the task

  • determine where to look for sources

  • review and finalize the success criteria with their supervisor

  • take notes in the process journal on the meeting



Supervisors will work with students to...

  • suggest people the student could consider interviewing, or help the student come up with appropriate search terms for web sources.

  • direct students to the library so they can utilize print sources.

  • review students’ process journals with them before concluding the meeting. Remind them that they should document the meeting in their process journal. They can do this during the meeting if they have a phone/laptop to sign-in to ManageBac, or they can complete it right after the meeting.


Helpful Links:


REQUIRED #2 Meeting (by Nov 17): Meeting #3 : Taking Action (Red Slice)

Students should meet with their supervisor in order to ...

  • determine how to apply their sources to their product

  • evaluate how their research has aided them in achieving (or being on the way to achieving) their goal

  • review criteria to make sure they are on track to be successful

  • continue working on, and complete, the product/outcome

  • take notes in the process journal on the meeting and upload to Managebac



Supervisors will work with students to...

  • to review students’ process journals with them

  • offer suggestions on how to use research or suggest areas to continue exploring for the development of the product


Helpful Links:




OPTIONAL Meeting (January): (January 12): Taking Action (Red Slice) and begin Reflecting (Orange Slice) ...or focus on any portion the student might be struggling with.


Students should meet with their supervisor in order to ...

  • evaluate the success of their projects

  • reflect on learning achieved during the process

  • determine how to apply their sources to their product

  • evaluate how their research has aided them in achieving (or being on the way to achieving) their goal

  • reflect on the approaches to learning (ATL) skills that are being applied through this process

  • review assessment criteria to see if there are any major holes in their process

  • begin organizing the paper component


Supervisors will work with students to...

  • to review students’ process journals with them

Helpful Links:



REQUIRED #3 Meeting (February/March): Meeting #5 (March 2): Reflecting (Red Slice)

Students should meet with their supervisor in order to ...

  • evaluate the success criteria

  • reflect on learning achieved during the process, specifically with how they applied the approaches to learning skills to their learning and their product

  • complete the report with the necessary requirements


Supervisors will work with students to...

  • offer feedback on the written report and the product

  • offer suggestions on reflection of the ATL skills

  • evaluate and reflect on the success criteria with the student


Helpful Links:


Guiding Questions


These are questions you might use to help students think about their project. You may want to ask students some of these questions when meeting with during advisement, and you should remind students to address these questions when producing their personal project paper.


The Goal

  • What global context did you use for your project and why? What specific features of the global context did you intend to focus upon in your project and why?

  • What personal interest topic did you select? Why did this topic interest you? How much prior experience or understanding of this topic did you have? How does this interest or topic directly relate to your chosen global context?

  • What goal did you set for your project? What specifications did you put in place to help you successfully complete your investigation and your project overall?


Select sources

  • What resources did you investigate for your project? Why did you choose them? Were some resources better than others? Did you have any difficulties finding or using resources?

  • How did you make your choices about what information to use and what to discard? How did you evaluate your sources?

  • Application of information

  • What exactly did you do to complete your project? What decisions did you make based on the information you discovered? How did you solve problems? How did the information affect your choices?

  • Were there any specific techniques you developed as a result of your investigation?


Achieve the goal

  • Did you adjust or alter your original goal as the project developed? If you made changes, why did you make the changes? Do you feel that you successfully achieved your goal?

  • What level of achievement would you award your product or outcome based on your specifications? Does your supervisor agree with this?

  • Reflect on learning

  • What new understanding do you have of the global context you chose to use as the context for your project? How did the area of interaction context give you a different or better understanding of your topic?

  • What specific skills did you need to develop/apply to investigate and complete your project? What new skills did you learn, or what existing skills did you improve?

  • What did you learn about yourself as a person through undertaking the project process? Which of the Learner Profile qualities did you find yourself exhibiting? Have you improved in any of these qualities?




What should students’ Process Journal look like?

(Criterion A)


Students will be using ManageBac to complete their process journal.


Their process journal should:

  • Demonstrate organization and time-management

  • Demonstrate information literacy

  • Demonstrate thinking and reflection

  • Students can use their process journal to:

    • Plan

    • Record interactions with Supervisors or other sources

    • Explore ideas

    • Save pictures, charts, maps, brainstorms, timelines, notes, illustrations, etc.

    • Reflect on work

    • Make Connections

    • Evaluate Achievements


The process journal is not a diary, or a static document. Students do not need to write in it every day, and they do not need to create detailed paragraphs about what they have done. Each entry should support their current needs, and should reflect where they are in the process. If used thoughtfully, the process journal will support them through the completion of their product and their report.


Supervisors are not responsible for evaluating the process journal. However, when you meet with students during advisory, you should remind them to work on their process journal.


Additionally, supervisors should ask students to bring up their process journals during each of the five required meetings.



What should the paper look like?


The paper students will complete for the personal project takes the form of a report. It is broken up into sections in which they will explain the process they undertook in setting their goals, conducting their research, and executing their project. In the paper, there are also sections where students will evaluate their own work and reflect on their accomplishments.


Students will begin drafting the early sections of this paper as early as September. Students have deadlines in their project handbooks that outline specific dates for completing parts of the paper—so the bulk of the work should be completed--however, the compilation of the entire report, as well as the revision and editing of their work, will take place at the end of the year.


Maximum Length of Student Submission

Document File Types: .doc, .pdf. rtf

Recording File Types: .mp3, .m4a., .mp4, .mov, .m4v

  • 15 pages, No recording

  • 14 pages, 1 minute recording

  • 13 pages, 2 minutes recording

  • 12 pages, 3 minutes recording

  • 11 pages, 4 minutes recording

  • 10 pages, 5 minutes recording

  • 9 pages, 6 minutes recording

  • 8 pages, 7 minutes recording

  • 7 pages, 8 minutes recording

  • 6 pages, 9 minutes recording

  • Between 1,500-3,500 words


Specifications

  • Written work should be 11 point font size

  • One inch margins

  • Visuals need to be clearly visual

  • Audio and video must be recorded and submitted in real time

  • Visual aids may be used to support spoken reports. However, evidence and examples presented in the visual aids should be submitted as documents.

  • Visual aids presented only in video format will not be considered for assessment.

  • The bibliography is uploaded separately and is not included in the page limit.

  • DO NOT include a title page; if included, it will count towards the page limit.


Formatting


The body of the paper is structured around the objectives and assessment criteria and it must include these sections.

  1. The goal

  2. Selection of sources

  3. Application of information

  4. Achieving the goal

  5. Reflection on learning and the product and what ATL skills were applied

  6. The Bibliography is an alphabetical list of sources used to research the personal project. It must be on its own page, and it must be in correct MLA format. The Bibliography does not count toward students’ overall word count.

  7. The Appendices are additional materials that students want to include at the end of the paper. These could include secondary information that may be of interest such as: a sample of a questionnaire a student used, a segment from the process journal, a graph of chart that the student produced, a transcript from an interview, a photograph or other work sample, etc. The materials included in the Appendices do NOT count toward the overall word count.


The length of the report must be a minimum of 1,500 words and a maximum of 3,500 words, not including appendices and bibliography.


Fall Semester (10th Grade)


August/September: Goal Defined (first section of the personal project paper)

  • By 1st week of September, students need to settle on a specific topic for their PP

  • After this point, students cannot change their topic or their goal

  • To complete this step, students need to write and submit a 1-2 page explanation of their PP. In this paper, they must:

  • Explain how their topic relates to something they are interested in

  • Justify the one Global Context they will focus on for their project

  • Create specifications that they will use to evaluate the success of their project (Criterion B)


September: Meeting #1 (early to mid September)

  • By this date, you need to have met with all your students, either individually or in groups, for the first time.


October: Sources Selected (second section of the personal project paper)

  • Third week in October

  • By this date students need to have identified the sources they will use for their PP.

  • The sources they select should be varied (they should not exclusively use the internet) and valid (they must evaluate the quality of the research they conduct).

  • To complete this step, they need to write and submit a 1-2 page discussion of their sources. In their paper, they must:

  • establish a wide variety of relevant sources

  • rationalize how each source is relevant to your Personal Project

  • thoroughly evaluate the quality of each source (Criterion C)


October/November: Meeting #2 (meet by third week of October)

By this date you need to have met with all your students, either individually or in groups, for the second time


December (first week): Sources Applied (third section of the personal project paper)

  • By this date, students need to have discovered how the research they completed will inform their PP

  • They will need to consider how the research they conducted impacts the Global Context they selected (how does it help them broaden the context of their work?). Similarly, they must consider how they will use their research to make decisions and create solutions.

  • To complete this step, students must write and submit a 1-2 page explication of the application of their sources. In their paper, they must:

  • Establish how they will use their research to meet the objectives they created in first semester (when they set their goal)

  • Demonstrate how their research has developed their understanding of their PP (Criterion D)


December: Meeting #3 (Meet by 1st or 2nd week of December)

By this date you need to have met with all your students, either individually or in groups, for the third time


Spring Semester


January: Meeting #4 (Meet by third week of January)

By this date you need to have met with all your students for the fourth time.


February: Meeting #5 (Meet by first week in March)

By this date you need to have met with all your students for the final time!

February/Early March TBD: Personal Project Product Presentations (4th section of the PP paper)

  • Students must prepare a presentation of their personal project

  • Presentations must be between 3 and 4 minutes long

  • In their presentation, students must describe their original goal, summarize their research, explain their product (and the process they underwent), and evaluate their achievement

  • Students will present their projects during the PP exhibition in March

  • To complete this step, students must write and submit a 1-2 page evaluation of their product

  • In their paper, they must consider the criteria they established back in first semester

  • Discuss how their product measures against the specifications they originally established

  • Evaluate the quality of their product


March week after spring break: Personal Project Paper DUE (fifth and sixth sections of the PP paper; entire paper formatted and revised; Title Page, Table of Context, and Appendices created and included)

  • By this date, students must have submitted a polished, final report on their PP.

  • They will need to compile and edit all their previously written PP papers, and write an additional one to two page Reflection on Learning in order to complete this step.

  • The Reflection on Learning should demonstrate how completing the PP has extended their knowledge, and allowed them to develop as a learner.

  • They need to organize all the papers you have completed into a formal report, with a Title Page, a Table of Contents, Clear Section Headings, and an Appendix.


March: The Week before Spring Break, Exhibition of the Personal Project:

By this date students need to have created a compelling display for their PP.

Students need to determine how to best visually represent their PP. They should consider that their display needs to be polished, and professional looking. Their display can include photographs, tri-folds, posters, recordings (videos/music), or any other form of school-appropriate media.

In order to complete this step, students must present their project at the exhibition in March.

Personal Project Rubric

Assessment Criteria

24 marks


Rubric

Maximum 8 per Criterion --Supervisor will score holistically for each criterion on a 1-8 scale

Criterion A = ____/8

Strand i: State a learning goal for the project and explain how a personal interest led to that goal

1-2: States a learning goal

3-4: States a learning goal and outlines the connection between personal interests and that goal

5-6: States and learning goal and describes the connection between personal interests and that goal

7-8 States a learning goal and explains the connection between personal interests and that goal


Strand ii: state an intended product and develop appropriate success criteria for the product

1-2: States their intended product

3-4: States their intended product and presents basic success criteria for the product

5-6: States intended product and presents multiple appropriate success criteria for the product

7-8: States their intended product and presents multiple appropriate, detailed success criteria for the product.


Strand iii: present a clear, detailed plan for achieving the product and its associated success criteria

1-2 Presents a plan that is superficial or that is not focused on a product

3-4 Presents a plan for achieving the product and some of its associated success criteria

5-6 Presents a detailed plan for achieving the product and most of its associated success criteria

7-8 Presents a detailed plan for achieving the product and all of its associated success criteria


Criterion B: Applying Skills = ____/8

Strand i: explain how the ATL skills were applied to help achieve their learning goal

1-2 States which ATL skill(s) was/were applied to help achieve their learning goal

3-4 Outlines which ATL skill(s) was/were applied to help achieve their learning goal

5-6 Describes how the ATL skill(s) was/were applied to help achieve their learning goal, with reference to examples or evidence

7-8 Explains how the ATL skill(s) was/were applied to help achieve their learning goal, supported with detailed examples or evidence


Strand ii: explain how the ATL skill(s) was/were applied to help achieve their product

See link for more information on the ATL Skills.

1-2 States which ATL skill(s) was/were applied to help achieve their product

3-4 Outlines how the ATL skill(s) was/were applied to help achieve their product, supported with superficial examples or evidence

5-6 Describes how the ATL skill(s) was/were applied to help achieve their product, supported with reference to examples or evidence

7-8 Explains how the ATL skill(s) was/were applied to help achieve their product, supported with detailed examples or evidence


Criterion C: Reflecting = ____/8

Strand i: explain the impact of the project on themselves or their learning

1-2 States the impact of the project on themselves or their learning

3-4 Outlines the impact of the project on themselves or their learning

5-6 Describes the impact of the project on themselves or their learning

7-8 Explains the impact of the project on themselves or their learning


Strand ii: evaluate the product based on the success criteria

1-2 States whether the product was achieved

3-4 States whether the product was achieved, partially supported with evidence or examples

5-6 Evaluates the product based on the success criteria, partially supported with specific evidence or examples

7-8 Evaluates the product based on the success criteria, fully supported with specific evidence or detailed examples


Notes about impact of the project:

could refer to any aspect of having done the project: inquiry, action and/or reflection

• could include progress made towards the learning goal

• could include ways in which the student has grown as a learner, such as improvement in the ATL skills

or learner profile attributes

• could include ways in which the student has grown or changed as a result of the project.



Grade & Descriptor

1 (1-4 marks)

Produces work of a very limited quality. Conveys many misunderstandings of the process of learning independently. Very rarely demonstrates critical thinking. Very inflexible, rarely shows evidence of knowledge or skills.

2 (5-8 marks)

Produces a report of limited quality. Communicates limited understanding of the process of learning independently. Demonstrates limited evidence of critical thinking. Limited evidence of transfer of knowledge or approaches to learning skills into the project.

3 (9-11 marks)

Produces an acceptable report. Communicates basic understanding of the process of learning independently through the project. Begins to demonstrate some basic critical thinking. Begins to transfer knowledge and approaches to learning skills into the project.

4 (12-14)

Produces a good-quality report. Communicates basic understanding of the process of learning independently through all stages of the cycle of inquiry. Often demonstrates critical thinking. Transfers some knowledge and some approaches to learning skills into the project.

5 (15-17 marks)

Produces a generally high-quality report that demonstrates a thorough process. Communicates good understanding of the process of learning independently through all stages of the cycle of inquiry. Demonstrates critical thinking, sometimes with sophistication. Usually transfers knowledge and approaches to learning skills into the project.

6 (18-20 marks)

Produces a high-quality report that demonstrates a thorough process. Communicates extensive understanding of the process of learning independently through all stages of the cycle of inquiry. Demonstrates critical thinking, frequently with sophistication. Transfers knowledge and approaches to learning skills into the project.

7 (21-24 marks)

Produces a high-quality report that demonstrates a thorough process. Communicates comprehensive, nuanced understanding of the process of learning independently through all stages of the cycle of inquiry. Consistently demonstrates sophisticated critical thinking. Successfully transfers knowledge and approaches to learning skills into the project with independence.



Grade & Descriptor

1 (1-4 marks) F

Produces work of a very limited quality. Conveys many misunderstandings of the process of learning independently. Very rarely demonstrates critical thinking. Very inflexible, rarely shows evidence of knowledge or skills.

2 (5-8 marks) F

Produces a report of limited quality. Communicates limited understanding of the process of learning independently. Demonstrates limited evidence of critical thinking. Limited evidence of transfer of knowledge or approaches to learning skills into the project.

3 (9-11 marks) C-

Produces an acceptable report. Communicates basic understanding of the process of learning independently through the project. Begins to demonstrate some basic critical thinking. Begins to transfer knowledge and approaches to learning skills into the project.

4 (12-14) C

Produces a good-quality report. Communicates basic understanding of the process of learning independently through all stages of the cycle of inquiry. Often demonstrates critical thinking. Transfers some knowledge and some approaches to learning skills into the project.

5 (15-17 marks) B

Produces a generally high-quality report that demonstrates a thorough process. Communicates good understanding of the process of learning independently through all stages of the cycle of inquiry. Demonstrates critical thinking, sometimes with sophistication. Usually transfers knowledge and approaches to learning skills into the project.

6 (18-20 marks) A

Produces a high-quality report that demonstrates a thorough process. Communicates extensive understanding of the process of learning independently through all stages of the cycle of inquiry. Demonstrates critical thinking, frequently with sophistication. Transfers knowledge and approaches to learning skills into the project.

7 (21-24 marks) A+

Produces a high-quality report that demonstrates a thorough process. Communicates comprehensive, nuanced understanding of the process of learning independently through all stages of the cycle of inquiry. Consistently demonstrates sophisticated critical thinking. Successfully transfers knowledge and approaches to learning skills into the project with independence.


Grade Boundaries for the new rubric will not be issued until after August 2022. However, Meridian School does have a conversion scale for 24 marks for MYP that we can use as a guide for grade boundaries.